Home » The Wet-In-Wet Watercolor Technique: Mastering The Basics To Paint Exotic Fish

The Wet-In-Wet Watercolor Technique: Mastering The Basics To Paint Exotic Fish

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Step 3: Using The Wet-In-Wet Watercolor Technique For Fluid Blends In Fish

wet-on-wet-exotic-fish-step-3

Continue dropping the same dark blue into the orange-yellow areas in the main body to tone down the warmth of these colors. Due to the wet surface, the paint will create soft blends with each other, which is the purpose of using the wet-in-wet watercolor technique. For the ends of the tail, mix in the darker blues such as Payne’s Gray, Indigo, and Prussian Blue, and paint in some lines for the fins’ skeletal structure. Mix in more Cobalt Violet Light for a deep indigo color and paint the gill area, then switch back to a warmer color by mixing Cadmium Red Purple, Brilliant Orange, Cadmium Yellow Lemon, and a touch of Cobalt Violet Light to paint the area where the lower fin attaches to the main body. Keep in mind that you can always change the composition for the sake of a better painting, and lift out any puddles with a clean dry brush. Paint will always dry lighter than when you first put it on paper as well, so don’t worry if the painting looks too dark when it’s wet. In fact, since the surface you’re painting on is already wet, adding more water will create a white “rind” in your painting while increasing the chances of damaging the paper, so try to hold off from diluting the paints too much.